INDIA FLINT - DISQUIET
Jul
21
to Aug 27

INDIA FLINT - DISQUIET

As early as 1800, Alexander von Humboldt observed the devastating effects of deforestation on climate and on the physiology of the land.  His work influenced Charles Darwin, John Muir and Henry David Thoreau. It also informed the research of South Australian climate scientist, the late Prof Emeritus Peter Schwerdtfeger, who made interesting observations regarding the vegetation either side of the rabbit proof fence, and how remnant bushland (as opposed to the wheat belt that runs right up to the barrier) cools the atmosphere and regularly receives higher rainfall than the agriculturally worked land.

South Australia is down to less than 5% of its original tree cover…and land is still being cleared. This fills me with disquiet.

The exhibition makes reference to deforestation, climate change, the gradual shifting of Goyder’s line and to the changing landscape of the state of South Australia. Works will include installations using bones, wild-harvested mud and the detritus of human habitation and farming as well as pieces for the wall using plant dyed cloth and paper. A sound piece created by the artist will add a further dimension.

India Flint

 

background

I live primarily on 500 acres of land situated on the eastern shoulders of the Mount Lofty Ranges in what was once the home of the Peramangk people of South Australia. The land was well-treed until the 1940s, when most of the redgums were felled. Two years after, creeks that had provided permanent water stopped flowing in the summer months.

My work, driven by topophilia, conflates the visual and written poetics of place and memory, using ecologically sustainable contact print processes from plants and found objects together with walking, drawing, assemblage, mending, stitch and text as a means of mapping country, recoding and recording responses to landscape - working with cloth, paper, stone, windfall biological material, water, minerals, bones, the discarded artefacts and hard detritus of human habitation, the local weed burden. The work has been described (by Prof Chris Orchard) as using “the earth as the printing plate and time as the press”.

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SILVER AND GOLD: UNIQUE AUSTRALIAN OBJECTS 1830-1910
Jul
21
to Aug 27

SILVER AND GOLD: UNIQUE AUSTRALIAN OBJECTS 1830-1910

Silver and gold: unique Australian objects 1830–1910 showcases exceptional nineteenth and early twentieth century Australian silver and gold objects drawn from the National Gallery of Australia’s significant collection of colonial decorative arts and design. The theme of this exhibition is celebration, with objects marking significant personal, community and professional achievements and milestones, or displays of prosperity and artistic accomplishment. This exhibition includes presentation, ceremonial and testimonial pieces, jewellery and functional tableware, displayed within themes of Sport, Agriculture, Dining, Goldfields, Achievement and Defining moments. Many of these objects are personalised with engraved inscriptions, providing insights into personal and professional achievements and family, social and business relationships.

Silver and gold celebrates the aesthetic and technical achievements of many of Australia’s most significant early silversmiths. It includes objects made by silversmiths who worked across the country, including Alexander Dick, David Barclay, Henry Steiner, William Edwards, Edward Fischer, John J Cohen and Jochim Matthias Wendt. These silversmiths worked in a range of historical revival and contemporary styles. While British and European aesthetics and traditions pervade the early silverware created in Australia, local styles emerged as a national consciousness developed and became more pronounced towards Federation.

This exhibition highlights the important role that Australia’s early silversmiths played within civic, church and community life. Individually crafted objects provide valuable social commentary about life in the nineteenth and early twentieth century as records of special events, identities and insights into what were considered essential ingredients at the time for building a ‘civilised’ society within the isolated bounds of the colonies. Many of the objects reflect the nationalist fervour of the late nineteenth century, embodying the ideas of nation-building through honouring the individual worker achieving excellence, the heroic sportsman and celebrating Australia’s unique flora and fauna.

Silver and gold reveals the exceptional skills of Australia’s earliest professional craft practitioners and their compelling narratives of Australian social and commercial history.

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